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JEREMY LITTON

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YEARS ACTIVE: 2012-2016

BIRTH PLACE: BUFFALO, WV

BIRTH YEAR: 1987

PRIMARY POSITION: OUTFIELD

BAT/THROW: RIGHT/RIGHT

CONTRIBUTIONS: PODCAST PRODUCTER, LEAGUE CO-FOUNDER, PODCAST CO-HOST, COLUMNIST, & LEAGUE RULES COMMITTEE MEMBER

TEAMS PLAYED FOR:

TERRORHAWKS (2012)

WELFARE WARRIORS (2013)

WEE WILLY WIFFLE (2014)

PLAIN WHITE TEES (2015)

BEAVER FEVER (2016)

ACHIEVEMENTS: 

PAUL MARTIN SPORTSMANSHIP AWARD (2012)

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Jeremy Litton began his wiffleball career before the Huntington Wiffle League was even founded. In 2011, he was part of the final and tenth season of the Garrett Drive Wiffleball League (GDWL) in Hurricane, WV. He captained a team called the Fat Bastards and did not show much athletic prowess on the field but did show an early ability to captain a team and organize strategy and ensure everyone has a good time. It was a brief season and one where Litton had not made much of a mark yet. The league folded after that summer and never played again.

Then, in spring of 2012, Josh Smith and Greg Sowards began laying the groundwork for what would become the Huntington Wiffleball League. They tried to recruit new players in the area but knew they would need some experienced players to help get the league off the ground. Litton was one of the first players called to action and he did answered without hesitation. He attended the first practices and every spring training session. He created the league's first header for the first website (which he also helped build) and spread the word about the league. The turnout for the inaugural season was less than 20 players but it would have likely flopped without Litton's involvement. He played on the Terrorhawks that first season and the team finished in third place. He also developed a grenade-toss pitching style that rivaled that of Greg Sowards. When he could find accuracy, he was unhittable.

In 2013 he was asked to captain a team as the league was trying to get expansion teams to fill out and split into divisions. Again, he answered the call to duty. He created the Welfare Warriors, a satirical team name digging at the Obama administration. He had only 2 other players on the roster by the time spring training came around and gladly took on a free agent to round out the squad at four. The team would be plagued by in-fighting, player attendance, and other issues. The player turnover was so great that the team had a total of 9 players throughout the season. The team finished the regular season with a dismal 2-22 record and most of the players quit before the playoffs, causing them not to participate.

Despite the humiliation endured in 2013, Litton was willing to aid the league in any way needed in 2014. When asked to captain a team again, he inexplicably said yes and began to resurrect the Fat Bastard team from the old league. Fortunately, it was not necessary and Litton joined Wee Willy Wiffle and was a valuable advisor to Patrick Rayl, who captained the team. From this point, we would begin to see Litton's player participation taper off. He showed up weekly and helped take photos, play when needed and assist with league committee decisions. In the 2013 off-season, he helped start the renowned league podcast program and it had become a deeper interest to him than playing and he played on an 'as-needed' basis, referring to himself as a "mercenary player for hire."

In 2015, he had not committed to a team by spring training and was not captaining a team. Andy Hill had started the Plain White Tees so the league could maintain 8 teams but had great difficulty maintaining a roster. Litton saw this and stepped in to provide a bat and extra hand in the outfield and was the difference between the team playing or forfeiting on many occasions. He provided advice where needed to the young team and they finished the season when many thought they could not.

In 2016, Litton again did not commit to a team and was holding out to see what teams would need an extra player. That year, Greg Sowards brought back the Beaver Fever franchise and could not find a solid core of players. Litton again stepped up to provide needed support to keep a team in existence. However, it unfortunately would be his final season. He unofficially retired at the end of the 2016 season but remained a part of the league as a rules committee, photographer and frequent guest and/or co-host of the league podcast. He also directed a pilot for the league's WTH (Wiffle Talk Hour) video program that same year. 

Litton has earned a spot in this hallowed hall of fame not for his baseball acumen or his ability on the field. But it was his heart, determination, sportsmanship, graciousness, and creativity that made him stand tall among all others. He helped found this league, and more importantly...he helped keep it together. Countless times Litton served as the voice of reason in heated behind-closed-doors league meetings and was the antidote to the poison of uncertainty the league faced through it's formative years. Anyone who has ever enjoyed playing in this league is in Litton's debt because there is no doubt it would have imploded before it reached it's potential if Litton had not bound us all together.

FOUNDER

FOUNDER

INNOVATOR

INNOVATOR

JOKESTER

JOKESTER

WRITER/PRODUCER

WRITER/PRODUCER

VOICE OF REASON

VOICE OF REASON

FRIEND

FRIEND

CAREER STATISTICS

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